Get your Utah-related products here
Get Travel Info
From Utah.com

Explore Utah

Search This Site
Got a Question, Comment, Suggestion?
ExploreUtah home
ExploreUtah.com Blog

title

BLM Areas
National Forests
Nat'l Monuments
National Parks
Recreation Areas
Southern Utah
Surrounding Areas
State Parks
Vacation Ideas
Wasatch Front
Wilderness Areas
Wildlife Refuges

title

title

title

Air Sports
Biking
Camping
Climbing
Conservation
Dinosaurs
Falconry
Fall Colors
Festivals
Fishing
4x4 + OHV
Ghost Towns
Golf
Hiking
Horseback Riding
Hunting
Miscellaneous
Photography
Rock Hounding
Ruins & Rock Art
Scuba Diving
Snow Sports
Water Sports
Wildflowers
Wildlife Viewing

title

Getting Around UT
Outdoors Info
Get the Gear
Events
Guides/Outfitters
Lodging

Activities

Tips for Making your X-C Ski Day the Best
Cross country skiing can be pretty easy. The gear is light weight, you can find tracks that are groomed and nice and flat. But like with any sport, paying attention to the weather and some common sense will go a long way to make your venture fun and safe for everybody involved.
  • Have your skis properly tuned and, if they are the waxable kind, waxed for the conditions. If you are not good at what kind of wax to use, ask at the reception desk. The wrong wax can slow you down, or can even cause the skis to stick to the snow.
  • Wear Layers. The air is cold, but you will be working up a sweat, so you want to have a base layer that will wick moisture away from your skin and then more outer layers that you can shed as needed. (Bring a backpack or fanny pack to hold extra—or shedded—clothing.)
  • Stay hydrated. Just because it is cold outside doesn’t mean your body doesn’t need water. You are exercising, after all, and need to drink often. It could be tricky keeping your water from freezing if the temps are very cold. Keep a water bottle or bag inside your coat.
  • Don’t ski over (or worse, walk over) the tracks. Stay in them.
  • Don’t hog the trail. Go single file, in the tracks (unless you are skate-skiing and are in the middle area of the lane.)
  • If somebody wants to pass you (or vice versa) proper etiquette suggests the passer calls out “track” and the slower skier should get out of the tracks, step aside and let the faster skier pass.
  • If there are inclines on the track, the downhill skier has the right of way.
  • Obey posted signs (don’t take a short cut if it means you will be going the wrong way on a one-way street!)
  • If you fall and create a crater in the snow, it is courteous to smooth it out so the next one to come along the trail doesn’t fall in your hole.
  • Stay on those trails that match your ability. If you are beginner, and you attempt an advanced trail, it is likely you will wear yourself out and worse, you will get in the way of those who really do belong there.
  • For safety reasons, it is always advisable to ski with a buddy. Never ski alone.

Backroads of Utah
by Theresa A. Husarik

In stores now.