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How To Photograph Skiers
Some photography tips for capturing skiing action on film or pixels.

Here's How:

  • Line up a model (your spouse or child will do!) and head to one of the resorts.
  • Dress appropriately. Your creativity will be hindered if you are cold, wet and uncomfortable.
  • Protect your camera gear, or use a waterproof camera. You don't want your camera to be ruined by a deluge of snow.
  • Use a film (or film setting if using digital) with a good compromise of film speed and grain to get the sharpest picture. I suggest a film speed around 100 or 200 ASA.
  • Find a spot where there will be some good action (like at the moguls, or just below a jump), and position yourself there. Tell your model come down a few minutes after you are settled.
  • Make sure the spot you pick is not in the other skier's paths. You don't want to cause an accident.
  • Use the motor drive feature on your camera (if you have it) to get multiple shots in succession. This increases the chances that you will catch the perfect moment.
  • Try different variations of lighting - backlighting, side lighting, front lighting.
  • Don't overlook the candid, grab shots. Sometimes the best pictures are those that were not set up.
Tips:
  • It is best to get there in the early morning or wait till late evening when the light is best.
  • Remember to pay attention to the things in the background, you don't want weird branches to appear to be coming out of your models' heads.
  • Pay attention to where the sun is. If you shoot straight into the sun, you will get a sun flare. Sometimes this looks great, sometimes it looks bad.

Backroads of Utah
by Theresa A. Husarik

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